Tres Sillones Presbiteriales
Three chairs made of carved cedar wood, connected as one piece of furniture. Chairs placed in the presbyteries were a symbol of the hierarchy between clergymen.

Tocador (Open)
Tocador, artist unknown (Patzcuaro, Michuacán, México, 18th century). Located at the Colonial Art Museum at Anauco House in Caracas, Venezuela. Photo registry by Daniel Santos in April 2018.

Tocador
Tocador, artist unknown (Patzcuaro, Michuacán, México, 18th century). Located at the Colonial Art Museum at Anauco House in Caracas, Venezuela. Photo registry by Daniel Santos in April 2018.

Silla de Brazos (II)
Chair No. 2 by Antonio José Limardo (1792). Located at the Colonial Art Museum at Anauco House in Caracas, Venezuela. Photo registry by Manuel Lara and Nathalie Naranjo in April 2018.

Silla de Brazos (I) (with cameras)
A chair at Quinta de Anauco Colonial Art Museum in Caracas, Venezuela. Photo registry by Manuel Lara and Nathalie Naranjo in April 2018.

Silla de Bazos (III)
Owned by the Valencian hero Dr. Miguel Peña (1781-1833). Donated to the Colonial Art Museum of Caracas at Quinta de Anauco, Venezuela in 1978.


Salero
Salt shaker, anonymous artist (17th century, Teruel, Spain). Located at the Colonial Art Museum at Anauco House in Caracas, Venezuela. Photo registry by Félíx León in April 2018.

Mueblería Española (Incomplete)
Description Pending - Needs more images